What is Depreciation Schedule?

What is a depreciation schedule?

Property depreciation is a legal tax deduction related to the ‘wear and tear’ of an investment property over time. A tax depreciation schedule outlines the deductions you may be entitled to claim each year of ownership on the Building Allowance (the structure itself including bricks, concrete, etc.) and, if eligible, on the Plant and Equipment items (internal items like ovens, carpets, blinds, etc).  

As with any tax deduction, claiming property depreciation reduces your taxable income. That means more money in your pocket to reinvest or to spend on yourself or on your family.

A depreciation schedule from Washington Brown is a fully-comprehensive, ATO-compliant report that helps you pay less in tax. The amount the depreciation schedule says you can claim effectively reduces your taxable income because it’s taking into account how much it costs you to own and maintain the property.

While you may be used to claiming on such items as council rates or property management fees where you have paid money towards an item or service, depreciation is a “non-cash deduction.” This is because it’s the ONLY deduction that you don’t have to pay for on an ongoing basis – its already ‘built’ into the purchase price of the property.

Order a report today and save

THE CGT Saver Report

   

Let me introduce you to our new product, the CGT Saver™ Report – A report specifically created to prevent our clients from paying too much in Capital Gains Tax.

Although you can no-longer claim depreciation on second-hand Plant & Equipment Items (ovens, dishwashers, etc.), with Washington Brown’s CGT Saver™, you can claim the applicable and documented value as a capital loss if you remove or replace any of these in the future.

Similarly, using this report, if you were to sell a second-hand property with those items still intact, what you would have been able to claim in depreciation in the past, you can now claim as a capital loss which reduces your capital gains tax bill.

This report lists and values all those included items that you have purchased at settlement. It then allows you to claim a capital loss straight away if any of these items are removed.

The best bit…This loss can offset other share &/or property gains that you might make.

This report is exclusive to Washington Brown, so ask for it by name and contact us to find out more.

Depreciation and Natural Disasters

Depreciation and Natural Disasters

Depreciation and Natural Disasters: Everything You Need To Know

A natural disaster could have a devastating effect on your investment property in Australia. You may need to get a new depreciation schedule to account for any repairs you make. Here’s what you need to know.

You cannot underestimate the effects natural disasters can have on an investment property. Australia deals with such disasters, and other issues, on a near-yearly basis. If such an issue affects your property, you may have to undergo a period of rebuilding. You’ll need to replace any assets you’ve lost, and possibly renovate or rebuild parts of your investment property in Australia.

This could make you wonder how natural disasters affect your rental property depreciation rates. On the one hand, you may have to pay out of pocket to bring your property back up to code.

After all, your insurance policy may not cover unforeseen circumstances. On the other hand, any improvements you make to the property improve its value. Your construction work could allow you to make more tax deductions. Australia has various regulations that ensure full compliance in such situations.

There are three situations you may find yourself in following a natural disaster. You’ll usually have to do at least one of the following:

 

You must approach each situation differently to maximise your ability to claim depreciation. Let’s look at each individually. 

Repairing Your Assets

Repairing an asset involves any work you undertake to bring the asset back to its original condition. This generally includes minor work only.  Depreciation Quote Schedule

If you make any improvements to the asset, you cannot claim it as a repair. This includes any physical changes to its appearance, or altering the asset’s functionality. These are upgrades, and you must treat them as such.

So, what can you claim for when repairing an asset? It differs depending on whether you have insurance.

If you have insurance, you can claim for the cost of repairing the asset. However, you must also declare any sum you received from your insurance policy. This will have a direct effect on your tax deductions. Australia does not allow you to claim the full cost of the repair if you have insurance.

However, those without insurance can claim the full cost. This is because you won’t have received any help in making the repair.

Replacing Your Assets

On the face of it, replacing an asset seems simple. If you can’t repair your previous asset, you must purchase a replacement. You can then claim for this replacement on your tax returns.

However, the issue of improvement comes into play again. The asset you purchase must have the same specifications and functionality as the damaged asset. Any improvements move the asset into the final category, which changes how you claim for it. Simply put, if the replacement isn’t like-for-like, it’s an improvement.

If you have insurance, you have to make several adjustments to your depreciation report. You have to account for both Capital Allowance, and Individual Depreciable Assets.

Those without insurance must scrap the depreciation value of the previous asset. Replace this with the new forecast for the replacement asset.

Making Improvements or Upgrades

Depreciation CalculatorAnything that improves the original asset is either an improvement or an upgrade. This includes changes to appearance and functionality. You may also have to claim on the asset as an upgrade if it has different specifications to the original asset.

So, how do you handle the depreciation? If you have insurance, you take the same action as you would when replacing an asset. Adjust your depreciation report to account for the Capital Allowance. Don’t forget the Individual Depreciable Assets either.

If you haven’t got insurance, you must get arrange a new depreciation forecast for your improved asset.

Working with a Quantity Surveyor

In all cases, work with a Quantity Surveyor to make your adjustments. These professionals will help you to forecast your depreciation tax deductions. Australia is home to many Quantity Surveyors, so do some research before selecting somebody.

The role your Quality Surveyor plays depends on your previous actions. If you had your property assessed before the disaster, your surveyor will make minor adjustments to your previous report. This costs less than a full report.

However, you will need a full depreciation report if you didn’t already have one. This takes some more time and money. However, the report will ensure that you claim all the depreciation you’re eligible for.

The Final Word

A Quantity Surveyor can help you to maximise your depreciation claims after a natural disaster. Arrange a survey as soon as possible to ensure you don’t lose more money than you have to.

Washington Brown maintains a team of expert Quantity Surveyors. Contact us today to find out more.

The Secrets of Backdating Your Property’s Depreciation

Property’s DepreciationProperty depreciation is one of the largest tax deductions for homeowners in Australia. But did you know that you can backdate your property’s depreciation? Doing so could save you thousands of dollars every year.

As an investor, you need to take advantage of all the tax deductions Australia has to offer. Property depreciation deductions allow you to control your cash flow from your property. As a result, you can use them to enhance your property’s profitability.

Many who own an investment property in Australia claim depreciation yearly.

Unfortunately, some overlook these deductions entirely. Happily, you can backdate your depreciation claims. Firstly, let’s look at what property depreciation means.

What is Property Depreciation?

So, what counts as depreciation for your investment property in AustraliaDepreciation Calculator

You can claim for any loss of value resulting from the wear and tear of the property as it ages. Capital works are the building’s structural elements, and you can claim for all of them, including the roof tiles and the concrete used throughout the building.

You can also claim for the wear and tear of any equipment in the property. This includes things like the property’s fixtures, but extends to things like carpets and ceiling fans. (Deductions for these plant and equipment items may only apply if you bought the property prior to May 9, 2017 – Read about the Budget changes here).

Claiming for your property’s depreciation is one of the most effective tax deductions in Australia. It allows you to reduce your yearly taxable income, which means your tax bill also decreases. When used correctly, depreciation allows you to take home more money each year.

Behind the deductions you claim for interest expenses, depreciation is one of the largest tax deductions in Australia. However, many investors fail to claim for all their property depreciation. Some even forget about it entirely, which could result in the loss of thousands of dollars over the lifetime of your investment.

Using Backdating to Claim Depreciation

So, what can you do if you haven’t claimed for all of the depreciation you’re entitled to? This is where backdating can help you.

There are two key steps you must take to backdate depreciation properly:

  1. Work with a Quantity Surveyor to create a full depreciation schedule for your property. Your surveyor will inform you about every item you can make a claim for. They will also discuss rental property depreciation rates with you.
  2. Bring the surveyor’s depreciation schedule to your accountant. He or she will alter your tax returns so that you claim for all of the depreciation you’re entitled to.

In most cases, you can only backdate depreciation for two years.

What is a Tax Depreciation Schedule?

Depreciation Quote ScheduleIf you’ve never claimed for your property’s depreciation, you may not know what a tax depreciation schedule is.

The schedule your Quantity Surveyor creates, offers a summary of every item in your property that depreciates in value. Think of it as an investment property tax deductions calculator focused solely on depreciation. The schedule notes every item, and informs you of how much you can claim for each over the course of the next 40 years.

As noted, your accountant can use this schedule to backdate your tax returns for the previous two years. However, they will also use it to help them to complete your future tax returns. This ensures you claim properly for all future depreciation of your property’s capital works and equipment.

Can I Backdate for More Than Two Years?

In most cases, you can’t backdate your tax returns for over two years. The Australian Taxation Office (ATO) has strict guidelines in place. These usually prevent you from exceeding the two-year limit.

However, that isn’t to say it is impossible. The ATO has different rules for companies than it does for individual investors. There are also different rules for those using a self-managed superannuation fund (SMSF), or a trust.

As a result, it’s worth speaking to your accountant to find out if your situation allows you to backdate for more than two years. It’s unlikely, but you may strike it lucky and be able to claim for even more depreciation than you expected.

Is Backdating Worth It?

Yes, it is. If you don’t account for your investment property depreciation, you could lose out on thousands of dollars every year. In fact, claiming for depreciation can turn a negatively geared property into a positive one.

On top of that, you can also claim the cost of your Quantity Surveyor as a tax deduction.

The Final Word

That’s everything you need to know about backdating depreciation. Speak to your accountant today to find out how far you can backdate your claims.

Washington Brown is here to help if you need a quality Quantity Surveyor. Contact us today to get a full depreciation schedule for your investment property.

Best Reasons to Invest in Commercial Property

Invest in Commercial Property

You have a choice to make when investing in real estate. Commercial properties may be more difficult to manage than residential homes. However, there are plenty of reasons why you should invest in commercial property.

So, you’ve decided to invest in real estate. Commercial properties may not seem like the best choice. They come with more complications than residential properties. This means you need to know more than the property investment basics. However, many argue that the benefits of commercial property outweigh the complications.

When investing in real estate, commercial properties may offer more security. However, there are plenty of other reasons for why you should consider them as an option.

Reason #1 – Stronger Yields

What rental yield should you aim for? This is a question that plagues many property investment novices.

Residential properties tend to offer lower yields. According to CoreLogic RP Data, you’ll achieve an average yield of 3.6% on a city-based residential property.

You can expect to earn anywhere between 8% and 12% yield on a commercial property. As a result, commercial real estate will often generate more income than a residential property.

Reason #2 – A More Secure Income

Depreciation CalculatorPeople often focus on risk when discussing commercial property. In particular, they concentrate on the issue of attracting tenants. You need to consider the needs of people in the local area. How your property caters to businesses relevant to those needs is also a factor. If your property doesn’t fit the bill, you’ll find it difficult to attract commercial tenants.

However, many ignore income security. With a residential property, you may find that a tenant leaves after six months. This means you have to go through the process of filling the vacancy again.

By contrast, a commercial lease lasts between three and 10 years. This means your property generates more income for a longer period of time. As a result, you can feel more secure in your income, and as a result make other investment decisions with more confidence.

Reason #3 – Rate Payments

You’ll often take on the responsibility of paying various rates with a residential property. In addition to council and water rates, you may also have to cover body corporate fees.

This isn’t an issue with commercial real estate. Commercial tenants will handle the rate payments for you. As a result, you spend less on the property each month.

Reason #4 – The Tax Benefits

Though you’ll enjoy various tax benefits with residential real estate, commercial properties have even more to offer.

Beyond capital works depreciation, you can also claim depreciation on plant equipment. This includes depreciation for air conditioning units and light fixtures. You can even claim for things like the carpet.

That’s not all. Commercial properties also offer strong building allowances, which you can use to reduce the amount of tax that you pay.

Reason #5 – A Lower Initial Cost

Commercial properties often cost less than residential properties. This is despite the potential they have to generate higher yields. For example, you may spend $100,000 on a commercial car park. By contrast, a small residential apartment could cost as much as $500,000.

As a result, you need to raise less money to get on the commercial investment ladder. Let’s assume you can get a loan worth 80% of the property’s value. That means you only need $20,000 to place a deposit on the commercial car park. The apartment deposit would cost $100,000.

Reason #6 – Protection Against Inflation

Depreciation Quote ScheduleInflation can have a massive effect on your property investments. If inflation rises, tenants have less money. With a residential investment, this leads to higher vacancy rates. You’ll also struggle to raise rents because tenants can’t afford higher prices.

You’ll deal with similar struggles when investing in commercial real estate. However, commercial yields tend to outstrip inflation. As a result, you have more protection when inflation becomes an issue. Even if you can’t raise your rents, a commercial property should still generate an income.

Reason #7 – You Can Rent and Own

Let’s assume you’re a business owner. You may want to buy an office, but that won’t make any money for your company. However, leasing means that your money goes straight into the pocket of an investor. What can you do?

With commercial property, you can own the property you rent. You can make the purchase itself using a self-managed superannuation fund (SMSF). Your business then moves into the property, during which time it pays rent into the SMSF. As a result, you essentially pay yourself, rather than a landlord, for use of the property.

The Final Word

There are many reasons to invest in commercial property. However, you need a high level of expertise to make the most of your investment.

Washington Brown can help with any depreciation concerns you have. Contact us today to find out how our Quantity Surveyors can help you to get more out of your commercial property investment.

The Budget Has Changed The Game

The Federal Budget released on the 9th of May 2017 has changed the game for property investors. federal budget

The Government has changed the game in the new budget by reducing depreciation deductions for residential properties.

And it’s good news too if you ask me!

In this webinar, you’ll  learn the 9 key takeaways from these changes and how they affect you as a property investor.

Some of the budget topics we discuss include:

  1. If I have already bought a property can I still claim property depreciation?
  2. How will the changes affect my cash flow as a property investor?
  3.  How Tyron Hyde cracked the code and got around these changes – legally too!!
  4. What type of properties will still enable me to claim depreciation on the building? Can I claim on Industrial, Commercial, Holiday rentals etc?
  5. What entities are affected by these changes and what entities aren’t?
  6. What happens if I renovate a property, am I able to claim depreciation on those renovations? If I buy a property that has already been renovated, what happens?
  7. Perhaps the most interesting point to be discussed –  how will the unclaimed depreciation be treated when I sell the property and have to pay Capital Gains Tax?
  8. In light of the new laws – what types of property should I as a property investor be targeting?
  9. How is new property affected by these changes?

The property investment equation has changed and will become a lot more complicated in future years.

This is one webinar every property owner should listen to so that you have a better understanding of the financial equation before making an investment decision.

If you have an investment property and have not claimed depreciation, there has never been a better time to get a depreciation quote.

If you are unsure about how much you can save now in relation to your property investment – try our Free Depreciation Calculator

Claim Depreciation on Previous Owners’ Renovations

Claim Depreciation from previous owner

You Can Claim Tax Deductions in Australia for Previous Renovations

When considering tax deductions in Australia, most investors only take their own renovations into account. It does make sense. After all, why should you be eligible to claim deductions on your investment property in Australia if you didn’t pay for the work?

Perhaps surprisingly, you can claim deductions for the previous owner’s renovations. However, there are several things you need to consider. For example, how much you can claim depends on when you purchased the property. The effects of the 2017 Budget play a role here, as what you can claim differs depending on if you made your purchase before or after the budget. Let’s look at what tax deductions in Australia you can claim in both scenarios.

You Bought Before the 2017 Budget

Things are simpler if you bought the property before the 2017 Budget. If this is the case, you can make claims under both Division 43 and Division 40 of the Income Tax Assessment Act (ITAA).

Division 43 relates to any capital works that the previous owner undertook on the property. This includes any renovations, such as the building of some extensions or remodelling a bathroom or kitchen. It also covers any work done to the building’s structure. For example, you’d be able to claim for a new roof or for some of the walls that the previous owner built.

Division 40 relates to the equipment installed in the property. Your investment property in Australia may have an air conditioning unit or some other piece of equipment Depreciation Quote Schedulethat the previous owner installed. If that’s the case, you should be able to claim for it.

The only real barrier is that you may not know the completion date for the work or the cost. Not all sellers will provide you with this information. If that’s the case, you need to employ the services of a quantity surveyor. Your surveyor will provide you with a cost estimate, which you can use when claiming tax deductions in Australia. The Australian Taxation Office (ATO) does not accept estimates from other professionals. For example, you can’t get an estimate from your accountant for the work. It has to come from a quantity surveyor.

You Bought After the 2017 Budget

This is where things get more complicated. You have to consider the extent of the renovation work, as well as whether any was carried out in the first place.

The new budget introduced the term “new residential premises” into the equation. To understand what this phrase means, we need to look at the Goods and Services Tax (GST) Act.

What Does the GST Act Say

You’ll find references to “new residential premises” in sections 40 to 75 in the GST Act. Generally, such a premises is one that has not been rented out or sold as a residential home before your purchase. This won’t usually present a problem. After all, that language basically covers new properties.

However, there’s more. The Act also defines these premises as those that have undergone “substantial renovation” work. The GST Act also provides a description for “substantial renovations”. They are any renovations through which the entire building has either been replaced or removed. As a result, the installation of a new bathroom is not considered as a substantial renovation on its own.

What Does This Mean for Me?

Depreciation CalculatorIf your investment property in Australia does not fall into the substantial renovations category, you may not be able to claim the same deductions that you could on a property built before the 2017 Budget. In particular, you won’t be able to claim Division 40 depreciation. New equipment on its own is not enough to constitute a substantial renovation.

However, this changes if the building has undergone enough renovation to become a “new residential premises”. In such cases, you can claim for both Division 43 and Division 40 work.

You’ll need the help of a quantity surveyor to work out the extent of the work undertaken on your building. Your surveyor will create a timeline for the building. This will estimate the work carried out, its cost and its extent. You can use this information to figure out if your building falls into the “new residential premises” category.

Don’t fret if it doesn’t. You can still claim for Division 43 work. Your quantity surveyor will be able to provide more exact information detailing exactly what you can claim for.

Conclusion

You’ll need the services of a quantity surveyor, regardless of when your property was built. They will be able to tell you what previous renovations you can claim for.

We can help you if you’re looking for a quantity surveyor. Contact us today to maximise the depreciation on your property’s previous owner’s renovations.

Finally, Some Clarity

On Friday 14th July, the Treasury Office released a draft bill regarding how depreciation deductions on a second-hand property can be claimed moving forward. They also invited interested parties to make submissions.

It’s complicated, to say the least, so I’ve tried to simplify this Bill and the key points. Here are my 9 Key Takeaways from the Legislation;

  1. If you acquire a second-hand residential property after May 10, 2017, which contains “previously used” depreciating assets, you will no longer be able to claim depreciation on those assets.
  1. Acquirers of brand new property will carry on claiming depreciation exactly the way they have done so to date. This is great news for the property industry and the way it should be.

We suspected this would be the case and I believe the property industry can collectively breathe a sigh of relief.Depreciation Quote Schedule

  1. The proposed changes only relate to residential property. Commercial, industrial, retail and other non-residential properties are not affected in the slightest.
  1. The building allowance or claims on the structure of the building has not changed at all. You will still need a Depreciation Schedule to calculate these deductions. This component typically represents approximately between 80 to 85 percent of the construction cost of a property.
  1. The proposed changes do not apply if you buy the property in a corporate tax entity, super fund (note Self-Managed Super Funds do not apply here) or a large unit trust.

This is interesting and I suspect a lot more people will start buying properties in company tax structures.

  1. If you engage a builder to build a house and it remains an investment property, you will still be able to claim depreciation on both the structure and the Plant and Equipment items.
  1. If you renovate a property that is being used as an investment, you will still be able to claim depreciation on it when you have finished the renovations.
  1. If you renovate a house, whilst living it in, then sell the property to an investor, the asset will be deemed to have been previously used and the new owner cannot claim depreciation.
  1. Perhaps the most interesting point: Whilst investors purchasing second-hand property can now no longer claim depreciation on the existing plant and equipment, they will have the benefit of paying less capital gains tax when they sell the property.

How? Well, in summary, what you would’ve been able to claim in depreciation under the previous legislation, now simply gets taken off the sale price in the event you sell the property in the future.

 Here is an example of how this will work:

Peter buys a property in September 2017 for $600k, included within the property was $25k worth of previously used depreciating assets.

 As they were previously used, Peter can’t claim depreciation on those items.

 Peter sells the property in 2022 for $800k, which included $15k worth of those depreciation assets.

 Peter can now claim a capital loss of $10k ($25k-$15k) for the portion that Peter has not claimed in depreciation.

 SUMMARY OF THE PROPOSED CHANGES

Depreciation CalculatorIn my view, the Draft Bill could’ve been a lot worse for both the property industry and the Quantity Surveying professions.

It will certainly address the integrity measure concern of stopping “refreshed” valuations of plant and equipment by property investors.

It may, however, create a two-tier property market in relation to New and Second-hand property.

You can see the ads now “Buy Brand New – We’ve Got The Depreciation Allowances”.

It will still be just as critical for all property investors to get a breakdown of the building allowance & plant and equipment values so you can:

 

  1. Claim the building allowance (where applicable) and
  2. Reduce the CGT payable when selling the property by deducting the unclaimed Plant and Equipment allowances.

The Quantity Surveying industry, just like the property development industry just breathed a huge sigh of relief.

I believe this integrity measure could’ve been better addressed and will be making a submission accordingly.

But it wasn’t a bad ‘first run’ by the Government!

P.S. If you purchased an investment property prior to The Budget, and it’s been an investment property the whole time, you are not affected and you should get a depreciation schedule quote now.

Tips & Tricks of the Depreciation Trade

9 Ways to Cut Tax Bills Through Depreciation

Firstly, what is property depreciation?

Well, just like you claim the wear and tear of your car against your taxable income or the wear and tear of the desk in your office, you can claim the wear and tear of your property against your taxable income.

But the property must be income producing. You can’t do this on your residential house. Property depreciation laws vary from country to country. I feel we have pretty good depreciation laws in this country. In a lot of countries, you can’t claim depreciation. So we’re lucky in Australia.

In summary, any property depreciation you claim would reduce the taxable income by the amount of depreciation you claim.

Now there are two parts of a depreciation claim:

First part is what’s called the capital works allowance that relates to the building and the structure. It lasts 40 years. This is commonly referred to as the building allowance. Now the amount of the deduction is determined by the actual construction cost, NOT what it costs to buy the property.

And in order for you to claim this building allowance, the property must be bought after 1985 for residential properties.

The second part that we’re going to talk about is what’s called plant and equipment- division 40. It refers to things like ovens, dishwashers, carpets, blinds, and also common property like lifts, fire services, and ventilation systems.

Note: Deductions for plant and equipment items and the following information may only apply if you bought the property prior to May 9, 2017 – Read about the Budget changes here.

Now, the more of this stuff you have in your property, the greater the tax savings. Why? Because this stuff wears out quicker.

Now let’s get into some tips:

1. The higher the building, the higher the depreciation

Why? Because it has more of that plant and equipment stuff that I’m talking about and this stuff depreciates faster. It also has things like gyms, pools, etc.

tips and tricks

2. Old properties depreciate too

You’ve already paid something for it. So while you can’t claim the structure of the building, you may be able to claim the ovens, the dishwashers, the blinds, etc. This is because the plant and equipment is based upon what you pay for it and the effective life of each item can be a benefit. That means that if the carpets is going to last two years, you may be able to claim it over for 50% each year.

And at Washington Brown we are so confident that we actually guarantee our results. So if we can’t get you at least twice our fee in the first year, we won’t charge you!

3. Buy items that actually cost you under $300

For instance, if I was going to buy a microwave, I wouldn’t buy one that costs $330 because I would have to claim it at 20% per annum. However, I’d buy one at $295 because I would be able to claim it immediately.

4. Sometimes furnishing your property can actually result in a greater depreciation deduction

Why? Because the furniture depreciates rather quickly compared to bricks and concrete. So putting things like dining tables, bedding and all that stuff into a furnished Depreciation Quote Scheduleproperty can actually accelerate your claim to the point that if you were to buy $20,000 worth of furniture, you could possibly get a $10,000 deduction in year 1 alone! But you’ve got to be smart about this. You can’t furnish all properties as it really depends on the location. So, this tip does not apply to all properties.

5. The actual construction cost must be used

Now that’s not a tip, that’s in the law. But what we found lately is that there are a lot of properties out there that are actually being sold close to their construction cost – certainly in some areas.

For instance, a property is sold at the original selling price of $95,000 in 2004. Our client just paid $45,000 for it. The original construction was $52,000. Now, I don’t know any other way that you can get a deduction greater than what you pay for something.

tips and tricks

6. Utilise the residual value write-off

If you were to renovate a property that was built after 1985, you should get a quantity surveyor out before you do the renovation so that we can put some values onto items that you are about to remove and you can get a written down value of those items and claim it immediately as a tax deduction.

So if you remove the kitchen, the light fittings, the shelf screens, etc., all that stuff can be written off if your property was built after 1985.

For instance, you bought a property that was built in 1989 and in that property there was a kitchen that was originally installed and you now wish to upgrade it. If you were to demolish now halfway through its effective life, you could get a $10,000 immediate tax deduction for it! However, just remember that the property needs to be income producing before you rip it out.

So the tip here is to get a quantity surveyor out before you renovate a post-1985 property.

7. Always use an expert

Quantity surveyors have been recognised by the Australian Taxation Office to estimate construction costs where the costs are not known. Accountants and valuers for instance, are not allowed to estimate costs unlike quantity surveyors. However, be careful as not all quantity surveyors specialise in this service, but Washington Brown certainly does.

Also, as far as I know, a depreciation report is the only tax deduction that can be subjective and open to interpretation skill. Every other tax deduction is based on what you pay for it.

8. You get more depreciation on a new property

Now let’s have a look at the difference between the depreciation of a new property versus that of a four-year old property. It’s very similar to the effective lives of the property, that in fact, you’ll be surprised. Now, most of the deduction within a property is actually related to the building allowance. However, you’ll definitely get more depreciation on a new property compared to a pre-1985 property.

9. Use the Washington Brown Depreciation Calculator

Now, this is a good tip. You can go online and check the depreciation available on your own property using our calculator, the first calculator that uses live data! You can check new versus old properties, get an accurate depreciation assessment, and the great news is that it’s free!

Now, here are some bonus tips:

tips and tricks don't get a builder to do your report

Bonus tip # 1: Don’t use a builder’s depreciation schedule

Builders are good at building. They miss out items and they sometimes don’t understand that the design and council costs can be included. Let a quantity surveyor do the depreciation schedule for you.

Bonus tip # 2: The type of materials is a huge factor

If you renovate, you might want to consider the type of materials you are going to use. For instance, carpets depreciate over 10 years but the floor tiling will depreciate over 40 so it can add up.

As another example, various types of partitioning may yield varying depreciation allowances. Some depreciate a lot quicker than others.

Moreover, we have air-conditioners and fans as examples too where the depreciation differs…

The types of materials used may vary and in turn, may change the depreciation allowance you can claim. So it pays to consider the item you’re about to install.

Bonus tip # 3: You can claim renovation even if you haven’t done the work

If you buy property that was built in 1900 for instance, but was renovated in 1990 not even by you, you can still claim depreciation. You can claim the renovation cost even if you didn’t do the renovation.

Bonus tip # 4:

Our iPhone app is downloadable from the iTunes store for free, enabling you to get numbers at the tip of your fingers! This great app also works on the iPad. Depreciation Calculator

If you want to crunch the numbers yourself, you need to input the 5 pieces of information below:

  1. Purchase price
  2. Nearest city
  3. The year the property was built
  4. Property type
  5. State of the finish within the property

Then, click calculate and Bingo! You can compare the depreciation deductions between the diminishing value method and the prime cost method!

And if you’re happy with the results, simply get a quote from us and give us a call so we can discuss the property over the phone. It’s all in the power of your hands!

Here are five things for you to take away today:

  1. Old properties depreciate too
  2. You don’t have to buy new to claim renovation
  3. Renovation helps your cash flow
  4. If you’re about to renovate a property that was built after 1985, get us out before you do so
  5. And remember: Always use an expert!

Thank you and if you have any questions, please contact us at 1300 990 612 or send an email to

If you need a depreciation schedule for your investment property – get a quote here or work out how much you can save using our free calculator.

The Depreciation Party Is Over

The depreciation party is over…

Well, kind of!

In an attempt to “reduce pressure on housing affordability” the Government has announced dramatic changes to the way depreciation is claimed on property.

Let’s start with the good news:

1.  Any existing investment properties purchased (contract exchange date) prior to May 9 2017 are not affected (unless they were not income producing in the 2016/2017 financial year).

2. Commercial, industrial and other non-residential properties are not affected.

3. Capital works deductions have not been affected. This means you will still be able to claim depreciation on the structure of the building provided it was built after the 16th of September 1987. And you will still need a Quantity Surveyor’s depreciation schedule to do so.

Now that we know what isn’t affected, let’s look at what has changed…

The government will limit plant and equipment depreciation deductions to outlays actually incurred by investors. In essence, unless you as the buyer had physically purchased the items – you can no longer depreciate them. This is a massive change to what you can claim – there by reducing investors’ cash flow.

Originally I thought a quick fix would be to structure the sales contract so that the plant and equipment is separated. But I suspect that the legislation will be worded such that if the plant and equipment was in situ at the time of purchase, you can no longer claim it.

You see, under the recent changes, I suspect the developer will be deemed to have bought the plant and equipment – not you.

budget depreciation changesHowever, the acquisition of existing plant and equipment will form part of the cost base, thus reducing your capital gains liability. So investors who hang on to their properties long term, will no longer reap the benefits of depreciating plant and equipment.

So in summary: if a residential property was built prior 1987,and has not been renovated – there will be no depreciation claim.

Depreciation CalculatorThis is very rare as most pre-1987 built properties we inspect have had some renovation carried out.

If built after 1987 – only the construction costs can be claimed.

Whilst there is still much uncertainty regarding the specifics of this budget’s depreciation-related changes, one thing is crystal clear: If you own a residential investment property and haven’t had a depreciation schedule prepared, now would be a good time to get a quote!

Developers, Project Marketers and Property Sales Agents – If you are selling property and using depreciation numbers that include plant and equipment: STOP NOW! This element needs to be removed from the selling equation, at least until the legislation is finalised.

Here is why I think this is dumb policy.

The proposed changes are being made to “reduce pressure on housing affordability.” In my opinion, it will have the opposite effect for 3 reasons:

  1. Property investors may now feel the need to hang onto their existing properties to continue claiming depreciation because if they sell that property they won’t be able to get as many deductions on the next one.
  2. Developers rely on high depreciation figures in the early years to show investors how affordable an investment property can be. If the allowances are taken away, they will struggle to get pre-sales which are required by banks to fund the deal.
  3. These budget measure are forecast to save $260 million over a 3 year period. I suspect far more will be lost if developers can no longer get new projects off the ground.

Whilst I believe housing affordability is a major issues, this appears to be policy on the run…so the Government can be seen to be targeting property investors, when changes to negative gearing could have been more effective.

I will provide a further update once the legislation is finalised.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Depreciation Quote Schedule