6 Reasons to Love Property

There are a myriad of reasons as to why I have been drawn to property

Below are the six main reasons:
love property

Reason # 1 – You can add value

One of the principal advantages of investing in property is that you can buy a rundown old property and increase the value of your investment by getting your hands dirty, or paying someone to get theirs dirty instead!

In comparison, it would be hard to add value to the Commonwealth Bank shares I own. Sure, I bank with the Commonwealth, but I don’t think my day-to-day savings account is going to add much value to the bank’s profits and in turn increase the value of my stock portfolio.

Admittedly, I can vote when it comes to the company’s annual general meeting, but are the voting rights attached to my 1,000 shares really going to make a difference?

For example, installing new carpet, painting and adding new blinds to an investment property will make an immediate difference to the tax returns available to an investor.

Reason # 2 – There is limited supply

A builder once said to me, “You can’t make property from a plastic mould”. I like the fact that property takes a while to plan and build Depreciation Quote Schedule because, in my opinion, the demand and supply equation has a lot to do with the price of property.

A development across the road from where I live in Bondi has been ‘in council’ for three years now. This means, it has taken three years for all the planning approvals to be passed – before construction has even started. And it will probably take two more years to build.

That’s five long years for the developer.

With shares, however, the company can make a capital raising at any time or issue options to directors or employees. This type of activity can dilute your shareholding making your piece of the pie smaller.

In contrast, you or the government can’t just issue another house and lot or land package in Bondi or any suburb you happen to like.

Reason # 3 – There are some capital gains tax exemptions

Unlike any shares I currently own, the home I live in does not attract capital gains tax (CGT) when I decide to sell it. The sale of your principal place of residence is one of the only assets that you won’t pay capital gains tax on. This has proved lucrative for many Australians, and I can’t see the law changing in this regard for a long time.

love property

Reason # 4 – It’s easy to KISS (Keep it Simple, Stupid)

I like property because it’s easier for me to understand compared to shares or other types of investment. Granted I work in the property industry, but I know if I buy a property for $500,000, I can get $600 a week rent. There will be expenses that I can work out and I can use the Washington Brown depreciation calculator to work out my depreciation claim. It’s simple, really! Have you ever read a share prospectus or company annual report and completely understood it?

Reason # 5 – I am the master of my own domain

I like property because I can be the master of my own domain. I can be the CEO of my property portfolio, the CFO of my investment and answerable to the board directors that I care about – my wife.

I don’t know about you, but I’m pretty sick and tired of golden handshakes to CEOs who have done the wrong thing to their staff or shareholders. I’m over self-interested company directors who pretend they have shareholder company value at heart. Do they really? As the CEO of my property portfolio I can guarantee I’m looking out for number one- myself!

Reason # 6 – It’s not a constant reminder

I like property because I’m not reminded of how much I have lost or made every day. Regular share market updates in the media mean you are constantly aware of the Depreciation Calculatorgyrations of the market and the value of your shares. And it’s really not necessary. I personally don’t wake up and wonder what the Nasdaq did overnight and I don’t want to worry about how that’s going to affect my share portfolio – if at all. If I need to have my property valued for any particular reason, for example if I plan to sell it or borrow against it, I will employ the services of a valuer. At all other times, as long as it’s not causing me any problems and the tenants are paying their rent, then I’d prefer to let it appreciate in value in the background without being a constant reminder.

Work out how much you save using our free property depreciation calculator or make it happen and get a free quote for a depreciation schedule now.

This blog is an extract from CLAIM IT! – grab your copy now!

Another Day, Another Idea To Fix Housing Affordability

Using super to buy a home… Is this the dumbest idea ever?

Recently I discussed the suggestion from various politicians including Barnaby Joyce that buyers trying to break into the market look to more affordable areas. The idea that currently has momentum, however, is allowing first home buyers to access their superannuation (super) early to use it as a deposit for a property.

Currently super can be accessed prior to retirement for a variety of reasons. These include severe financial hardship or permanent disability, but buying a home is not one of them.

The idea of allowing young buyers to dip into their retirement savings keeps coming up time and time again. Liberal MP John Alexander one of the biggest advocates. That’s despite it flopping when Paul Keating first raised it back in 1993, and even he, seemingly forgetting his election platform back then, has now rubbished the idea.

In my humble opinion, it’s the dumbest idea ever.

pro cons for housing affordability

The argument for

The point of allowing first home buyers to access their super early is of course to enable – or at least help – them to get into the property market sooner, before prices rise even further out of reach.

Advocates point to New Zealand, which has adopted this policy, and has a quickly rising take-up.

And that’s about it for the positives of the argument.

The argument against

The arguments against the idea are numerous, far outweighing the positives.

The thing is, allowing first homebuyers to use their super for property is actually likely to worsen affordability. Prices are likely to be driven up due to an increase in the capacity for people to pay for housing. So, essentially it would be counterproductive.Depreciation Quote Schedule

Not only would it likely lead to a surge in demand, with more buyers in the market, but it will give those who can already afford a house more money to play with. Meaning they’ll be able to pay more for property, driving up property prices. Existing home buyers will be the only winners.

On top of this, it would severely compromise the whole point of super, which is to provide an income in retirement.

Not only will the lifestyle of our future retirees be significantly hampered, but they’ll likely be completely reliant on a government pension. But will we as a country even be able to afford to pay all these people to live? Probably not – which is why super was introduced in the first place.

Retirees might own their own home, but what will they use to live off? Don’t forget, this includes buying food and paying for living expenses.

The reality is that most young people don’t even have enough money in their super accounts for a home deposit. A recent analysis finding displays the average super balance for young people was lower than what’s needed for a 20% deposit.

You see, you get the most compound growth in super during and after your youth. This is when you’ll grow your balance. Making it a big part of why the money needs to be left there.

So if you ask me, this is not the time to tell someone with all their life savings in a quality super fund with a mix of asset classes to take out all their money and bet on one asset class – housing. This is especially the case since property prices are likely nearing – or are at – the top of the market in Sydney and Melbourne. So the potential is there to actually lose money if overzealous first homebuyers pay too much.

 

housing affordability

What should be done instead?

Investors have largely been blamed for rising house prices and for pushing first home buyers out of the market. However, nagging proposals to get rid of investor benefits such as negative gearing and the 50% capital gains tax discount have been supposedly taken off the table.

Market forces should be left to iron out the problems in the market. But if government intervention is needed, the best solution is likely to be an increase in supply. The Depreciation Calculatorsupply is needed especially in Sydney and Melbourne.

It would also be wise for governments to invest in infrastructure in regional areas. Or those further from the city to draw people away from our capitals and into areas where demand is not so great.

According to basic economics, when demand is greater than supply prices are pushed up. So, if supply is increased but demand stays the same prices should level out. Or at the least, grow at a slower rate.

Conversely, if you increase demand, as allowing buyers to access super would do, but keep the supply the same, prices will be driven even higher.

So, what is actually going to happen? Will first homebuyers be allowed to dip into their super in Australia?

The Federal Government has committed to addressing housing affordability. However, for now they seem to have taken this idea off the table due to widespread criticism. Although we will have to wait and see what their solution is in the May budget.

I, for one, can’t wait for the next bright idea!