Why Buying Off-The-Plan Will Make You Money

Buying Off the Plan

Don’t Be Put Off Because You Can’t Explore The Property

There are many things you need to consider when buying an investment property in Australia. While the process may be exciting, it can also be confusing. 

One of the main choices you need to make relates to the type of property you buy. Do you purchase an older property that has a track record of generating income, or a brand new property that may stand a better chance of meeting the demands of tenants?

What if we told you there’s another way? Instead of buying a property that already exists, you can buy one that’s under construction. This idea may stray away from the property investment basics that you’ve read about while working out the complexities of investing in property for beginners. However, we can offer six reasons for why an off-the-plan property could prove to be a wise investment.

Reason #1 – Earn Early Capital Growth

What’s one of the first investment property tips for beginners that you’ve heard? It’s probably to buy low now so you can make a profit later. Buying an off-the-plan property allows you to do just that. So how does it work? It’s simple. You pay a deposit to the developer, and this secures your ownership of the property.

However, the construction settlement date may be several years in the future. As a result, you can earn capital growth for the home, even during the period prior to construction. You won’t even have paid the full price of the property before it starts making money for you. Depreciation Calculator

Reason #2 – Stamp Duty Savings

Buying an investment property in Australia comes with a lot of added fees. The largest of these is often stamp duty. In most states, you will have to pay thousands of dollars in stamp duty before you can take ownership of the property. Take Victoria as an example. For a property worth $500,000, you’ll have to pay almost $20,000 in stamp duty.

Buying off-the-plan can help to avoid this major fee. Most states don’t charge stamp duty on properties that don’t exist yet, which means you make thousands of dollars in savings from the beginning.

Reason #3 – Extra Saving Time

You only have to put down an initial deposit when you buy an off-the-plan property. As we mentioned before, you may have to wait for a couple of years before construction finishes.

This gives you plenty of time to save some money. Once construction ends, you could have thousands of dollars that you wouldn’t have had if you’d bought an existing house. You can then put this money toward your home loan, reducing the principal so that you pay less interest on the loan over time.

Reason #4 – You Can Claim Depreciation

Depreciation Quote ScheduleYou may be planning on renting out your off-the-plan property when construction ends. If so, you may be able to claim thousands of dollars in tax deductions in Australia on the property.

Make time to create a depreciation schedule with the help of a quantity surveyor. This will highlight all the things that you can claim as depreciation upon completion of the property. This may include the new furniture and fixtures that you add to the property before making it available to tenants. The higher the depreciation, the lower your holding costs.

Reason #5 – You Can Pick the Perfect Plot

Showing early interest in a new development comes with its own advantages. In addition to benefitting from the lower prices that developers often charge to their early investors, you also get to choose from the best plots of land.

This will benefit you monetarily when construction ends. Getting in early means you can pick the property that will have the best views or offers the amenities that your tenants will want. As a result, you can charge higher rents, so your property generates more income.

Reason #6 – Reductions in Other Costs

A brand new property does not come with the maintenance needs of an old property. That should go without saying. You won’t have to earmark thousands of dollars for repairs, as the property should be good to go from the moment construction ends.

However, did you know that off-the-plan properties could save you money in other areas? It’s all thanks to recent changes in the Australian Building Code. New properties must now meet several energy efficiency criteria. This means the cost of utilities falls, which benefits both you and your tenants.

The Final Word

Buying off-the-plan may seem scary at first. After all, you don’t have the opportunity to explore the property before you buy it.

However, it opens the door to savings that you wouldn’t have access to with an existing property. To find out more about buying an off-the-plan investment property in Australia, contact Washington Brown today.

Should You Buy For Capital Growth or Rental Yields?

When it comes to purchasing property there are a multitude of factors to consider. Where should you buy? What should you buy? How much should you pay? While these are the most common questions investors will ask, perhaps one of the most pertinent questions that needs to be answered before anything else is ‘Why should I buy?’

To put it more clearly, you need to have clear goals for why you’re investing in property, and then devise a strategy to help you achieve those goals. Surprisingly this isn’t something many investors do, but it’s essential for success.

A large part of your strategy will be determining whether you need to buy properties that offer strong capital growth or rental yields.

There are those in each camp espousing their respective benefits, but which one takes precedence is often different for each investor depending on their financial circumstances. Ultimately, however, every investor should be aiming to acquire a property that offers both – not one or the other.

Capital growth

capital growth or rental yields

Capital Growth Property

Having a capital growth strategy means you’re aiming to buy a property that experiences strong growth in value over time.

A property that has the best chance of growing in value is one for which demand outstrips supply. It’ll be in high demand due to its investment fundamentals – that is, it’s in a good location, close to employment, amenity and public transport, and there are imminent growth drivers such as infrastructure projects.

Often properties with high potential for capital growth have lower yields and are therefore negatively geared, with expenses exceeding the income.

Rental yields

Having a high-yield strategy means you’re aiming to find a property where the rental income covers most, if not all, of the costs associated with owning it.

While the capital growth on these properties will often be lower, they won’t cost you as much to hold. Depreciation Quote Schedule

Having a strong rental return is more important than many investors realise because it enables you to hold onto a property for the long-term while you wait for capital growth. If your portfolio is too strongly negatively geared you can run into financial trouble – if interest rates rise, for instance, or you have a big unexpected expense, you’ll be forced to find more to pay out of your own pocket.

Can you have it all?

Believe it or not, you can have a property that offers both good rental returns and capital growth.

It may not be easy to find, but if you do thorough research the right property in the right location will provide both. That’s not to say a high-capital growth property will necessarily provide an investor with positive cash flow, but it may be only minimally negatively geared after tax deductions.

What you should be aiming to buy is a property that offers the best possible cash flow for the best possible growth. You need both to invest as the former will keep you in the market, enabling you to service the debt, while the latter will eventually get you out, enabling you to realise a profit.

If you can’t find a property with both capital growth and a solid yield from the outset, then find one that has all the fundamentals for capital growth and where the yield is likely to increase soon due to strong rental demand.

Your yield can also be improved through measures such as minor renovations, adding extras or even by furnishing your property (for more on this see our upcoming blog providing 13 suggestions for maximising your rental yield).

How can you decide which to prioritise?

The broad goal of property investing is to create wealth over the long term, and it’s clear that focusing on capital growth is the way to do this.

While a property investment’s yield is crucial to its success, it’s not the key to wealth creation, and when investors make the mistake of prioritising yield over growth, they usually end up losing money.

High-yielding property might seem tempting, but when you do some simple calculations it’s evident that in the long-term you’ll make more by focusing on capital growth. Not only will your property be worth more, but the rental income will also be higher. Consider the following example:

Purchase price Yield Capital growth Value in 20 years Income in 20 years
Capital growth strategy $500,000 5% pa 10% pa $3,363,750 $168,188 pa
High-yield strategy $500,000 10% pa 5% pa $1,326,649 $132,666 pa

Capital growth will also largely be the key to expanding your property portfolio;

it will give you equity, which you can leverage off to buy more real estate.

While capital growth is the key to creating wealth over the long term, you will also need to be able to service further debt with subsequent purchases, and that’s where rental yields come in. Depreciation Calculator

Ideally with each purchase you’ll be aiming to have both strong capital growth and decent yields, but if you have a portfolio of properties you may also opt for balance – that is, to have some that are negatively geared and some that are more cash flow positive. The surplus cash flow from the high-yielding properties can be used to cover the costs of the low-yielding properties.

Tax deductions can also help you service debt and hold your property, minimising any shortfall between rental income and expenses.

Just how much of a shortfall you can afford will depend upon your circumstances at the time you buy. If you don’t have a great deal of surplus cash you’ll need to look at focusing on high-yielding properties so your holding costs are smaller, while someone with an adequate surplus will be able to comfortably meet the shortfall between rental income and the costs of holding the property, and will be able to focus on a capital growth strategy.

This may change over time – once you have acquired a few high-yielding properties your improved cash flow might allow you to focus more on capital growth.