The Five Things Your Tax Depreciation Schedule Must Contain

Tax Depreciation Schedule

An investment property tax deductions calculator won’t always show you everything you can claim. Many leave out the assets that go into a typical depreciation schedule. Here are the things that your tax depreciation schedule must contain.

When it comes to tax, there’s one question you must ask about your investment property: what can I claim?

There are the basics of course. Everybody looks into mortgage tax deduction. Australia is full of financial experts who can help with this issue. You may even find that an investment property tax deductions calculator can do the basics for you.

But what about property depreciation? It’s a type of deduction many investors miss, but it could save you thousands of dollars every year. Others make claims, but do so using the wrong schedule. Again, they end up missing out on thousands of dollars in savings.

You need to call in the experts. No, that doesn’t mean your accountant. Instead, a Quantity Surveyor is the professional you need to create a strong depreciation schedule.

The typical schedule will include the depreciation of capital works and equipment. However, some leave out other, less obvious, assets. Here’s what your depreciation schedule must contain if you’re to maximise your deductions.

Item #1 – Common Indoor Items

(Deductions for these plant and equipment items may only apply if you bought the property prior to May 9, 2017 – Read about the Budget changes here).

You may have chosen a unit or apartment as your first investment property. Australia has several cities, which can make such properties a wise investment choice.

Naturally, you’ll claim depreciation on your unit’s assets. But what about the assets that it shares with other units in the apartment complex? You can claim for your portion of those too, but many investors miss out on these deductions.

Common items include fire extinguishers, air conditioning units, and lifts. You can also claim for ventilation and hot water systems. You don’t get to claim depreciation on the full value of the asset, but even a little bit can help with your cashflow.

Item #2 – Scrapped Items

Depreciation CalculatorLet’s assume you’ve carried out some renovations on your property. Oftentimes, you’ll have a bunch of assets left over that you no longer have a use for. Many just throw such items away, without giving them a second thought.

That’s a mistake. Old items have what’s known as a scrapping, or residual, value. This is the item’s value once it’s reached the end of its use.

You can claim a final depreciation sum on any items you intend to throw away following renovations. Such items include old appliances or carpets. Have a Quantity Surveyor create a new depreciation schedule prior to your renovations. This will ensure you catch any assets with scrapping value.

Item #3 – Common Outdoor Items

Let’s come back to shared items. It’s not just the common indoor items you can claim depreciation on. Any common items outside the apartment block itself have value to you as well.

This includes pathways, fences, and various landscaping items, such as pergolas. You may even be able to make claims on a shared swimming pool.

However, you can’t claim for all common outdoor items. For example, turf and plants won’t find their way into your depreciation schedule.

Item #4 – The Fees You Pay to Design Professionals

Did you realise that you can include the fees you pay to design and construction professionals in your tax deductions? Australia offers plenty of opportunities to build your own property. Investors often go down this route, rather than buying an existing property.

Your depreciation schedule must account for the costs of such construction work. This includes the money you paid to any designers or architects who worked on the project.

Make sure you supply your Quantity Surveyor with accurate receipts for these services. This will allow you to maximise your claim for the fees you pay.

Item #5 –Money You Pay to the Council

You may have to pay fees to the council for various services. For example, there are costs involved with lodging application fees, or getting council permits. Depreciation Quote Schedule

If you’re building your own property, you may also have to spend money on infrastructure. This might include gutters and footpaths.

Your depreciation report should include all these items. Again, this is something that many investors miss out on because they don’t think the costs relate directly to their properties.

The Final Word

Check your depreciation report again. Does it include all the items on this list? If not, you’re missing out on several Australian Taxation Officer (ATO) tax incentives for homeowners.

You need the help of Washington Brown to create an accurate tax depreciation schedule. Call us today to speak to one of our Quantity Surveyors about your property.

Capital Works Deductions On Your Investment Property

Capital works allowance

The capital works allowance, or the building allowance as it is more commonly called, refers to the construction costs of the building itself including items such as concrete and brickwork.

Capital works deductions

Capital works deductions are income tax deductions. They can be claimed for expenses such as building construction costs or the cost of altering or improving a property.Depreciation Calculator

Regarding residential properties, the general deductions are spread over a period of 25 or 40 years. When you purchase a property, keep in mind that the capital works deductions are not able to exceed the construction expenditure.

Also, no deductions are available until the construction has been completed if you are waiting on a new build to claim your deductions.

Deductions based on construction expenditure apply to capital works. Some examples are as follows;

 

capital works

Construction expenditure

Construction expenditure refers to the actual cost of constructing the building or extension. Deductions are possible on the expenses incurred in the construction of a building if you contract a builder to construct the building on your land.

However, there is construction expenditure that is not able to be claimed in deductions.

Some of these costs that are not included are listed below;

Cost base adjustments refer to figuring out the capital gain or capital loss from a rental property. It is possible that the cost base and reduced cost base of the property will need to be reduced to the extent that it includes construction expenditure in which you, as in investor, can claim in capital works deductions.

Information for New Build Properties

If you’ve engaged a builder, bought a house and land package, or constructed a brand new home yourself, then there is some great news!

  1.   The 2017 Budget changes to depreciation don’t affect you (provided you never lived in the house yourself); and,
  2.   We can generally complete your report at a lower fee, as we won’t have to conduct an inspection (provided you can supply us with the correct information)

Regarding the first point, the changes that restrict deductions on plant and equipment for second hand properties don’t apply to brand new properties. As a result, your depreciation claims will generally be much higher, especially in the early years of ownership.

Unfortunately, if you lived in the property as an owner occupier at any point, the plant and equipment assets are deemed to have been “previously used” and therefore ineligible to be claimed once you do start renting the property out. It’s not all bad news though, you can still claim on the Building Allowance, which for brand new property is usually quite substantial.

As for completing the depreciation schedule for a lower fee, there are three things we require you to provide:

  1.      The total construction cost or purchase price

Generally, a copy of your building contract will satisfy this requirement, although make sure to include any post-contract variations.

If you organised the build yourself, a spreadsheet of all the costs incurred is required (e.g. Council fees, architect fees, trade costs, appliances, finishings, etc).

If the property was purchased as a house and land package, and the developer did not provide a cost split between the house and the land, then the total purchase price will suffice.

 

  1. Schedule of Finishes

Your builder will normally provide you with this before they commence construction. Often it is a document, around 10 pages long, listing all the inclusions the builder has agreed they will provide (sometimes with individual costs next to some of these inclusions).

For house and land packages, it is common for this list of inclusions to be displayed on just one or two pages.

Both types of schedule of finishes should include items such as the kitchen appliances, floor coverings, electrical fittings, air conditioning type, etc.

 

  1. Plans

The final floor plans of your property are all we require for this step. However, if you have the electrical plan and/or floor coverings plan, they are often very useful too.

So, generally that’s all the extra information we require specifically for New Build properties. If you have further questions about any of these steps, or depreciation in general, email info@washingtonbrown.com.au and one of our depreciation experts will help you out.

What a load of Scrap!

Whenever I am delivering a presentation or conducting a webinar, I always make sure to leave time for a 30 min Q&A session at the end.

In most Q&A sessions, the topic that by-far receives the most queries has to do with the concept of “scrapping” in relation to property tax depreciation.

Claiming the Residual Value on items that are about to removed can significantly increase your tax depreciation deductions. The problem is that many investors who renovate miss out on this due to a lack of awareness.

It’s important to understand the basics of property depreciation before diving into the subject of scrapping so, let’s have a quick re-cap into what property depreciation is all about.

What is Property Depreciation?

Just like you claim wear and tear on a car purchased for income producing purposes, you can also claim the depreciation of your investment property against your taxable income. Depreciation Calculator

There are two types of depreciation allowances available: depreciation on Plant and Equipment Assets and the Capital Works deductions.

Whilst both of these costs can be offset against your assessable income, the property must be used for income-generating purposes. It is also important to note that to be eligible to claim on the Capital Works component, a residential property needs to have been built after the 18th of July 1985.

So what is scrapping and why is it a hot topic for property investors?

Put simply, scrapping is the ability to claim deductions on items within your investment property that you are about to throw away.

Engaging a qualified Quantity Surveying firm will ensure that you do not miss out on claiming any eligible residual value of these items as a depreciation deduction. This value can be claimed immediately in whole, once the items have been removed.

The reason it’s such a hot topic is due to the fact that these deductions can often add up to thousands of dollars.

There is one major caveat though. In order to claim the residual value on these items, your rental property must be producing an assessable income prior to the disposal.

There is no clear guideline on how long the property needs to be rented out for though, just that is was producing an assessable income.

scrapping schedule

There are two ways we can assess the scrapping allowances of an investment property.

Option 1 – Only depreciable assets can be scrapped

(This means the building was built before 1985 and no residual capital works deductions are available)

For Division 40 depreciable assets, if a taxpayer ceases to hold a depreciating asset (sold or destroyed) or ceases to use a depreciating asset (doesn’t need it anymore) a “balancing adjustment” will occur.

You work out the balancing adjustment amount by comparing the asset’s termination value (sales proceeds) and its adjustable value.

If the termination value is greater, you include the excess in your assessable income but if the termination value is less, you deduct the difference.

These deductions can add up quickly. Even if only in relation to depreciable assets.

Let’s crunch some numbers:

Joan Smith settles on a property for $650,000 on Oct 15 2015, the property had a long term tenant in place, who had agreed to stay for another 6 months. The property was 19.5 years old when she settled on it. Depreciation Quote Schedule

Washington Brown inspected the property on Oct 15 2015 and assigned the following values to the depreciable assets listed

below:

Oven $  625, Carpets $ 1536, Blinds $  885, Range Hood $  475 & Dishwasher $  558

Joan decides, voluntarily, to upgrade the apartment so that she can attract a higher quality tenant. At the end of the lease, when the tenant moved out, Joan replaced the items above.

Joan can claim the full depreciable amount of $4079 in her 2015/2016 tax return for these items that she is removing.

In addition, Joan has spent $8,555 replacing the items above, she can now start to claim these new items based upon their individual depreciation rate.

Option 2 – Depreciable Assets and & Capital Works deduction can be scrapped.

If you start moving walls or replacing kitchens in buildings built after 1987: your claim has the potential to be huge!

And let’s face it, it’s not that unusual to want to update a 20 year old kitchen.

Now let’s crunch the numbers on a situation where Joan renovated the kitchen and bathroom as well:

Capital Work item Cost in  1995 Residual Value in 2015
Kitchen Cupboards $7,750 $3,875
Kitchen Benchtop $2,500 $1,250
Plumbing Bathroom & Kitchen $6,375 $3,188
Electrical Bathroom & Kitchen $4,750 $2,375
Tiling Kitchen & Bathroom $8,750 $4,375
Ceilings $850 $425
Render $655 $328

The items above have been depreciated at 2.5% per annum for 20 years. That equates to 50% left of the value that can be claimed as an immediate deduction when removed in 2016.

That’s the tidy sum of $15,816.00 as an immediate tax depreciation deduction!

One thing that needs to be considered when calculating the amount of deductions available, is whether you or another person was not allowed a deduction for capital works.

“It’s complicated” but here the method statement from the Income Tax Assessment ACT:

The amount of the balancing deduction

Method statement

Step 1.    Calculate the amount (if any) by which the * undeducted construction expenditure for the part of * your area that was destroyed exceeds the amounts you have received or have a right to receive for the destruction of that part.

Step 2.    Reduce the amount at Step 1 if one or more of these happened to that part of * your area:

           (a) Step 2 or 4 in section 43- 210, or Step 2 or 3 in section 43- 215, applied to you or another person for it;

          (b) you were, or another person was, not allowed a deduction for it under this Division;

           (c) a deduction for it was not allowed or was reduced (for you or another person) under former Division 10C or 10D of Part III of the Income Tax Assessment Act 1936 .

          The reduction under this step must be reasonable.”

So in simple terms, you need to take into account any periods where Capital Works deductions could not be claimed and reduce that amount from any residual value left.

The last line is interesting, “The reduction under this step must be reasonable”.

 

I say interesting, because there are so many variables and not a lot of rulings to go by. But in my opinions here are some reasonable examples:

 

  1. It would be reasonable to assume that if you purchased an industrial or commercial property, Capital Works deductions were available the whole time. So no allowance for non use would be required.
  2. It would be reasonable to assume that if you purchased a serviced apartment, Capital Works deductions were available the whole time. So no allowance for non use would be required.
  3. It would be reasonable to assume that if you purchased a unit in a ski resort, it was used, perhaps, for 2 weeks of the year for private use by the previous owner and you would need to factor that in.
  4. It would be reasonable to assume that if you purchased a holiday house, in area where holiday lettings are common and that you saw the property listed on AIRBNB prior to your purchase and the holiday period was blocked out – then you should factor 2 weeks of private use per year into the equation.
  5. Now the tricky one, you buy an average unit with a tenant in place. Who knows, it may have changed 5 times since it was new. I think it would be unreasonable for you to have to find out the full history of the unit. Privacy laws are very strict now, particularly in Victoria. So in that case, I would personally assume it was an investment property the whole time – but that’s me!!

One final thing you need to factor in, just to make life more complicated, is whether any amounts were received by way of insurance.

The termination value or residual value needs to include the amount received under an insurance policy.

So, if it is insured, there is often nothing to deduct when the asset is lost or destroyed.

As you have probably gathered by now, claiming the residual value on depreciating assets and capital works deductions “is complicated”.

 

I would recommend speaking with your accountant or financial advisor prior to engaging a Quantity Surveyor to carry out a scrapping schedule. If you are going to proceed with this type of report, it is advantageous to have the quantity surveyor visit the property prior to you starting renovations.

New Strata Laws for NSW

All eyes on forced sales as the new NSW strata laws are introduced

As of November 30, new strata laws have come into effect in New South Wales after many years of ‘toing’ and ‘froing’.

Whilst these changes encompass over 90 reforms, the one everyone is talking about deals with collective – or ‘forced’ – sales.

Essentially, there has been a softening in the current requirement that 100% of owners must agree to amalgamate and end their strata scheme in order for the unit block to be able to be sold to developers.

Now only 75% of owners need to agree. That’s right 75%! What about the remaining 25% you ask? Well, they can now be forced or compelled to sell.

This will no-doubt cause shock and outrage for some however this approach is not a new idea. For example;  other countries such as Singapore require a minimum of 90% of owners to agree. Closer to home, other states around Australia are also now pushing for similar legislation to be introduced in their respective territories.

The figures floating around suggest that more than 75,000 strata schemes and 2 million people will be impacted by this reform in NSW.

why

The reasoning

Why has the State Government introduced this reform? The simple answer is that they’re trying to encourage urban renewal.

There is a multitude of old and dilapidated apartment buildings across NSW, particularly in Sydney. Many are well-past their use-by date, and REINSW Strata Management Chapter Chair Gary Adamson notes that the cost of maintaining these is substantial. In some cases, this maintenance expense is almost equivalent to replacement cost.

Adamson states that introducing reforms to allow more sales to occur will not only alleviate the issue of residents having to fork out huge sums of money all the time, it will also allows for more higher-density accommodation developments to be built in areas close to major infrastructure.

This ‘more efficient’ accommodation is needed to cater for Sydney’s growing population. The city’s current population of more than 4 million is set to expand by nearly 50 per cent to 6.6 million in 2036.

All these extra people will need somewhere to live and chances are they’ll want to be close to amenities and services. Fair enough. This of course means that the only way forward for the city when it comes to meeting its rapidly growing housing demands is up. Indeed, it’s expected that by 2040 around half of Sydneysiders will live in strata accommodation.

While the collective sales law provides for forced sales if the minimum percentage of owners agree, it doesn’t necessarily mean the building will be knocked down to make way for a new higher-density building. The alternative is that the existing building can be put to better use by having a developer add apartments to the existing footprint and update the general block. In this case, owners can potentially move back in after the work is completed.

Forced Sale NSW Strata Law

The potential issues as I see it

Since it’s only just been implemented, we can’t exactly predict the benefits and consequences of collective sales as a result of these new laws.

While Adamson is aware there may be some issues arising from the reform, he believes overall it will be a positive thing providing much-needed residential accommodation in Sydney.

It will also allow those owners who do want to sell an opportunity as they will no longer be held back by a small minority. In some cases, one owner has refused to sell because they’re holding for a ‘pie in the sky’ price. I’ve personally heard of many situations where elderly owners don’t want to leave their homes and therefore won’t sell.

Some investors could also object to sales – many may want to hold their appreciating assets for the long term, and they also may want to avoid tax implications arising from any sale, with timing being critical.

The main issue that could arise out of forced sales is the way the sale proceeds are divvied up.

It appears that the proceeds will be divided between individual unit owners according to their unit entitlements, which are the lot owner’s share of the strata scheme. This is used to calculate levy contributions and determine the voting power of each lot owner. Depreciation Calculator

Unit entitlements are generally set when the building is constructed and the strata scheme is formed. It is important to note that in the past, there has been no requirement for unit entitlements to be based on a valuation of lots – rather they were largely determined at the developer’s discretion.

As such, unit entitlements don’t necessarily reflect the current value of the property. To illustrate this, consider two identical side-by-side units with the same unit entitlement; they might be now be valued differently if one has been significantly renovated and the other hasn’t been well maintained.

Owners that are forced to sell may, in particular, dispute the distribution of sales proceeds based on such examples.

In such cases, if the owners agree, the sale proceeds may instead be divvied up according to an independent valuation rather than unit entitlements.

The legislation, however, does provide safeguards for disputes over fair value. If the owners cannot reach an agreement, it will likely go to court to be decided.

What I can say with certainty is that there will be teething issues. “Nobody has gone through this so it’s yet to be tested,” says Colliers International Capital Markets Investment Services executive Tom Appleby. “It’s a grey area.”

Going forward, issues with unit entitlements versus real value should be reduced as it’s now been mandated that the former must be determined by a valuer rather than the developer submitting their own self-assessed unit entitlements.

Residential Vs. Commercial PropertyResidential vs commercial

The impact of the collective sales law isn’t restricted to residential properties either. Commercial and industrial properties are also in the mix.

In fact, Appleby believes it will predominantly be commercial buildings that are impacted.

There are many older commercial buildings in Sydney’s residential-zoned areas that are strata-titled he elaborates, and these properties provide great opportunities for developers to come along and build high-density units.

What’s more, he says, is that these commercial buildings will be cheaper to buy than residential apartment buildings.

Many commercial strata owners will be impacted by these sales, says Appleby. They might be reluctant to move but will be forced to, and will most likely be pushed out of owning and into leasing space.

“One of the major issues is there will be a shortage of commercial property to own, with older rundown (strata-titled) commercial buildings withdrawn from the supply and turned into residential buildings,” he says.

NSW Strata Laws NSWCould there be a big payday for unit owners?

Appleby says that owners in strata schemes should be aiming for 100% of owners to agree if they want developers to pay a premium, because the process for the developer will be hassle-free. Depreciation Quote Schedule

“It’ll be a headache for developers if they only have 75%, “ Appleby says. “Owners will really only get the ultimate premium if they’re offering the building in one line.”

While the objecting owners will be forced to sell in line with the new laws, Appleby says developers may have to fund legal proceedings to get the deal across the line which requires time, effort and money.

“It will be a stumbling block,” he says.

Speaking from a commercial standpoint, Appleby says that if the building is zoned for residential, then there will absolutely be a big payday for unit owners going down the collective sales route.

“Some owners are looking to get double what it was one year ago,” he says. “It depends on the zoning and where it’s located; some are looking at a lot more.”

Since the reforms have been mooted for some time, Appleby suggests that developers have been actively looking for commercial strata-titled buildings in good residential-zoned locations for at least a year to take advantage of the new collective sales law and build high-density units.

He states that many have approached owners directly, seeking to buy 75% and get control of the buildings to develop ready for when the new laws were implemented.

Rather than selling direct to developers, he says owners should be seeking to get professional advice to help them get the best possible price.

Other significant reforms

While collective sales are drawing everyone’s attention, there are a number of other interesting reforms to be implemented from the new strata laws, including:

More information about these other reforms can be found here.

 

Is The Block the world’s worst development?

Washington Brown has crunched the numbers on The Block’s latest development in Melbourne’s inner-city bayside suburb of Port Melbourne, and something just doesn’t add up.

 From a financial point of view the development, which consisted of transforming a 1920s art deco building into a luxury apartment block, was one of the worst he has ever seen.

While I understand the magic of television, Channel 9 has outdone David Copperfield in creating the illusion of a profit to the public!  Depreciation Quote Schedule

Let’s look at the numbers:

According to reports Channel 9 bought the site for around $5 million, which allowed for 6 apartments. Only 5 were sold on TV and for calculation purposes let’s say the acquisition costs is $4.2 million.

The construction cost and depreciation allowances totalled over $11 million, for the 5 apartments alone.

That’s $15.2 million alone in construction and acquisition costs.

It’s worth noting that under the Income Tax Assessment Act 1997 the initial vendor (ie. the developer) has an obligation to pass on the actual costs of construction to the purchaser, where the costs are known.

Let’s not forget there’s then a variety of other costs involved in buying and selling, and undertaking a property development, including:

Whilst some of these costs may have been avoided due to contra deals, the bulk would have to be outlaid by Channel 9. Depreciation Calculator

I estimate these additional costs to conservatively be $2 million, which brings the total cost to $17.2 million.

The Block’s total sales realised just a little over $12 million, leaving the development in the red by around $5 million, yet it has been indicated that profits of up to $715,000 were made by the contestants.

That something David Copperfield would be in awe of.

You know it’s the peak of the market when reality TV shows are pulling rabbits out of a hat to show a profit.

Whilst the contestants may have walked away with some ‘profit’, if the numbers are to be believed as shown on the show that development was a stinker.

The worry is these shows give an unrealistic expectation to would be budding renovators.

How will Donald Trump impact Australian property?

What does Trump’s election victory mean for Aussie real estate?

Since the US election, there’s been endless speculation about what the win from Donald Trump will mean for not only the US, but other countries around the globe.

Would you believe that the predictions for Australia’s property market range from doom and gloom through to uplifting and very positive, including that property prices could rise, property prices could fall, there could be a recession…

But the key here is that it’s all speculation. What will really happen remains unknown, particularly since Trump’s policies seem to be subject to change and we don’t know what will actually be implemented until he’s in office next year. In fact, he probably doesn’t know himself!

Donald TrumpLet’s look at the positive vs. negative case

‘The Donald’s’ election win scared investors and sent shockwaves through the share market, with $32.5 billion wiped from the ASX. It quickly rebounded, however, with more than $50 billion added the following day, the best session since 2011.

Did the confidence of real estate investors take a hit too? Since the real estate market doesn’t see the impact of these events until further down the track, we don’t yet know. However, in the initial aftermath of the election, there has been a case put forward that Trump’s win could actually benefit our market.

It’s all to do with confidence and sentiment. The big positive for Australia in all of this could be an increase in foreign investment. Our country is seen as a safe-haven in the midst of global volatility, which could lead to greater demand for property and hence, push up housing prices. Depreciation Quote Schedule

Some commentators suggest demand from foreign investors could come from the United States itself, with its citizens choosing to either relocate elsewhere (although this is unlikely – just think of all the celebrities who have already reneged on their promises to leave the US!) or simply invest their money in a country they consider to be safer than their own. The US is already one of the biggest sources of foreign investment in Australia’s property market.

Chinese investment in our real estate market is also likely to rise. The case is already pretty compelling for Chinese investors to move their money here; irrespective of Donald Trump they love buying Australian real estate. Australia has long been seen as a safe-haven for Chinese capital. Despite measures introduced to curb foreign investment, Chinese investors continue to buy Australian real estate in large quantities, lured by not only the perceived security of our market but by factors including our lifestyle and great schools. In this sense, the Trump phenomenon could just be another factor strengthening their desire to invest in Australian real estate.

While some Chinese investors seem to indicate they don’t care about Donald Trump and his election to the US presidency, there is an argument that he has “declared war” with China, with promises to tighten trade agreements and increase tariffs on goods imported from China into the United States.

Some economists have argued that Trump’s trade policies could have a very detrimental impact on the global economy, potentially leading the Australian economy into a recession, negatively impacting upon the share market and the property market, which is where price fall predictions come in.

It seems interest rate predictions have already changed since Trump’s election; prior to it there was an expectation of another fall in the cash rate, but now an upward move appears more likely, as Trump’s trade policies could cause global inflation to climb. Combined with a weakened Australian dollar, this could provide an impetus for the RBA to increase the base rate.

Donald TrumpTrump’s real estate interests

Let’s not forget Donald Trump is a real estate tycoon with property developments around the globe. He has built office and residential towers, hotels, casinos and golf courses around the world, perhaps surprisingly, he has towers in countries including Turkey, Panama, India, the Philippines and Uruguay.

While post-election Trump has said he now doesn’t care about his business empire, the fact remains that he clearly has a vested interest in real estate and keeping property markets around the world buoyant – at least where he has properties!

It will, of course, have to be balanced by his responsibilities as the leader of the free world and his determination to do what’s best for the US and its citizens.

Other interesting snippets about Donald Trump and property include:

Donald Trump

Remember it’s all about hypotheticals at the moment

We can all sit here and make claims about what Trump’s presidency will mean for Australia’s real estate market, but the reality is that we don’t know. It’s all speculation, and there’s a lot of misinformation out there too. What will really happen will only be determined in time.

At the end of the day, the fallout will be all about confidence and sentiment. IT will come down to whether people have the  Depreciation Calculatorconfidence to continue investing in the share market versus property, and in the US versus other countries that are perceived to be safer.

It also depends on whether Australians have the confidence to keep investing in Australian real estate. Unless a recession hits, it’s likely they will. Why? Because of the fundamentals supporting our real estate market, including population growth, a stable economy, a strong banking system with tight lending restrictions, and a shortage of properties in some areas.

Any deterioration in confidence will likely be short-lived, just like Brexit.

As time goes on the initial shock will subside. The protests will eventually come to an end, and it’s likely Trump’s presidency will be more measured than people expect. Which should translate to sentiment being restored in the long term.

Property prices in the UK have indeed defied all the naysayers’ post-Brexit, being up by 7.7% over the past year according to the latest figures.

With everything being just predictions and speculation, how about we add another to the mix: Maybe the best course of action is to go and buy some shares in Boral so you can benefit when the wall is built along the Mexican border?

Increase Cash Flow with these Depreciation Tips

Property depreciation tips

Claiming depreciation is one of the most important steps in an investor’s journey. Here’s my Top 5 Tax Depreciation tips to maximise the return on your investment property.

Number 1: Use an Experienced Quantity Surveyor

You’ve just paid hundreds of thousands of dollars for a property. Do you really want to risk missing out on tens of thousands of dollars in deductions just to save a couple of hundred tax deductible dollars on the ONLY tax break available to you that can be open to interpretation and skill?

The ATO has identified quantity surveyors such as Washington Brown as appropriately qualified to estimate the original construction costs in cases where that figure is unknown. The laws have also changed frequently over the years and each building is unique, so it pays to get expert advice. The ATO requires all companies who prepare Tax Depreciation Schedules to be registered Tax Agents.

Number 2: Claiming the Residual Value Write Off

I believe millions of dollars will be missed over the coming years in tax depreciation claims due to changes in what can be defined as ‘plant and equipment’.

Depreciation Quote Schedule

If you are renovating a kitchen or bathroom in a property built after 1985 – get a quantity surveyor in before you demolish so they can assess what the residual value of the existing items are. This residual value can be claimed as an outright deduction and can generate huge savings in the first year (The plant and equipment component of this may now be considered a capital loss rather than deduction from your personal income taxes due to recent Budget changes).

For instance, a rental property with a 20 year-old kitchen could possibly attract an immediate deduction of around $5,000 if removed.

The added bonus is that you get to claim depreciation on the new work once it is complete too!

Number 3: Small Items and Low Value Pooling

(NOTE: Deductions for these plant and equipment items may only apply if you bought the property prior to May 9, 2017 – Read about the Budget changes here).

A dollar today is worth more than a dollar tomorrow so deduct items as quickly as possible.

Individual items under $300 can be written off immediately. An important thing to remember here is that provided your portion is under $300 you can still write it off.

For instance, say an electric motor to the garage door cost an apartment block $2000. If there are 50 units in the block, your portion is $40. You can claim that $40 outright – as your portion is under $300. You can also try to buy items that depreciate faster such as purchasing a microwave that costs $295 as opposed to one that costs $320.

Items between $300 and $1000 fall into the Low Pool Category and attract a higher depreciation rate. So for instance, a $1200 television attracts a 20% deduction whilst a $950 television deducts at 37.5% per annum.

Number 4: Old Properties Depreciate too

Even properties built before 1985 (when the building allowance kicked in) are worth depreciating.

Depreciation Calculator

The purchase price of your property includes the Land, Building and the Plant and Equipment. As a quantity surveyor we help you apportion or break down the purchase price into those categories.

In about 99% of cases we find enough plant and equipment items to justify the expense of engaging our firm (for ‘Pre-Budget’ properties). At Washington Brown we guarantee to save you twice the fee of engagement or your report will be free!

Number 5: Use the Washington Brown Tax Depreciation Calculator

The saying goes “if only I knew then what I know now!” When it comes to depreciation, you can. Investors can use our website, free of charge, and get an instant estimate of the likely tax depreciation deductions on a property before they buy it.

This calculator uses real life data collated from every inspection we do on behalf of our clients. So the data gets more accurate with time.

For more information on depreciation or to discuss your specific investment property, call us on 1300 990 612 or email sales@washingtonbrown.com.au. Tyron Hyde is a director of Washington Brown – The Property Depreciation Experts. He has a degree in construction economics and is an associate of the Australian Institute of Quantity Surveyors.

What is Building Consultancy?

Building Consultancy

Building consultancy services help investors and developers recognise, maintain and increase their property’s value, while helping to minimise their risk. Building consultancy services include:

A good quantity surveying firm will also advise on all matters relating to property development and occupation in conjunction with other in-house teams and client-appointed consultants.

CASE STUDY

Property Type: Healthcare Clinic
Location: North Sydney
Service: Capital Expenditure Plan (CAPEX)

A private hospital contracted Washington Brown to undertake a 15-year Capital Expenditure Plan (CAPEX) of their newly-built specialist clinic and research and development facilities. The private hospital had leased the building to numerous medical consultants via a Service Level Agreement and was pro-active enough to ensure that the building would be maintained in the future by working out the cost of future maintenance and thus charging the tenants a nominal amount yearly. Depreciation Quote Schedule

Washington Brown reviewed the entire asset which included the building fabric, building structure and all the services within the six storey (including a two-storey below ground car park) building. We took into account the high usage areas, life span of components, potential problematic areas, general wear and tear, etc., to create a year-by-year spreadsheet, together with a summary page of all capital expenditure costs and a total cost over the 15-year period.

This allowed our client to determine the service charge levy that they should be charging each tenant, depending on the size of their tenancy. By providing a copy of our report to the tenants, our client could demonstrate the future capital works that were planned and the costs attached to these works.

The report reassured our client that there would be sufficient funds to maintain the building to its current high standard of finish, and ensure the electrical and mechanical services would be functioning as intended. The tenants were also reassured that the landlord would be maintaining the building and that there would not be any demands for high costs from their landlord in the future.

If you require a building consultant – please visit our building consultancy page.

This blog is an extract from CLAIM IT! – grab your copy now!

How to Stay Under the ATO’s Radar…

Learn how to stay under the ATO’s radar by watching this video

A depreciation schedule on your investment property can generate significant tax savings – as long as it has been complied correctly.
In my experience there are three areas the ATO tends to target come tax time.
One of them is whether you’ve claimed repairs and maintenance correctly. This can be tricky. Depreciation Calculator

Your property must also be income producing in order to claim depreciation.

For instance, if you make a repair while living in the property, then move out 2 months later, you can’t claim it.

The third area of concern is in relation to the building allowance.

The building allowance refers to the wear and tear on the actual building – things like bricks and concrete. You have to make sure they’re being claimed in the right category and not alongside items like carpets and blinds, which are considered plant and equipment.

The building depreciation allowance must also be claimed on construction costs – NOT the purchase price of your property. A mistake I see time and time again.

And that’s where we can help. Quantity Surveyors are recognised by the Australian Tax Office as the right people to estimate these costs. NOT valuers nor real estate agents.

So there you have it. To stay under the ATO’s radar, make sure:

Your repairs are being claimed correctly
The property is an income producing asset
The building allowance is based on the construction cost.
And most importantly, use a qualified quantity surveyor.

If you need a depreciation schedule for your investment property – get a quote here or work out how much you can save using our free calculator.